Last edited by Shasida
Tuesday, May 5, 2020 | History

7 edition of Cochineal and the insect dyes found in the catalog.

Cochineal and the insect dyes

Frederick H. Gerber

Cochineal and the insect dyes

by Frederick H. Gerber

  • 107 Want to read
  • 23 Currently reading

Published by The Author .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Cochineal,
  • Dyes and dyeing

  • The Physical Object
    FormatUnknown Binding
    Number of Pages70
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL8514221M
    ISBN 100960181431
    ISBN 109780960181438
    OCLC/WorldCa4338308

    Cochineal-based dye is again becoming popular as a coloring agent, especially in processed foods. Scientific classification: The South American cochineal insect is Dactylopius coccus. Cochineal insects belong to the order Homoptera and the scale family, Dactylopiidae. North American dye-producing scales are also in the genus Dactylopius.   In the mid s, with the advent of chemical dyes, which were cheaper to produce, the demand for cochineal in the fabric industry waned and the industry all but collapsed. But in the late s, the push to use natural products rather than chemical ones in foods have made cochineal and carmine, its purified form, increasingly important as food.

    A. Kendrick, in Natural Food Additives, Ingredients and Flavourings, Carminic acid/carmine. Carmine or cochineal is a well-established crimson pigment extracted from insects in South America. 15 The insect source has connotations for the final food as it cannot be claimed to be vegetarian, kosher or halal. The specific insect Dactylopus coccus costa is found on varieties of cactus. A great book about the brutal conquest of the Americas and cochineal production. You can see a travel diary of how the insects are reared, collected, and then turned into dye in Mexico at the.

    Cochineal has been the source of a beautiful scarlet dye and food coloring; Kermes yields a reddish dye dull and faded in comparison to cochineal, used in the Middle Ages and found in Neolithic cave paintings and the wrappings of Egyptian mummies; Lac Scale Bugs exude a resin used in making shellac; Trabutina mannitara or manna, is a scale. Cochineal: A Bright Red Animal Dye. Cochineal: A Bright Red Animal Dye is a Master's Thesis about the red dye extract from cochineal insects. It was written by LaVerne M. Dutton, who received a Master of Science in Environmental Archaeology from Baylor University in Waco, Texas.


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Cochineal and the insect dyes by Frederick H. Gerber Download PDF EPUB FB2

Cochineal and the insect dyes Paperback – January 1, by Frederick H Gerber (Author) › Visit Amazon's Frederick H Gerber Page.

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Learn about Author Central Author: Frederick H Gerber. COCHINEAL INSECT, COCHINEAL DYE PRODUCTION original antique print and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at Cochineal and the Insect Dyes - AbeBooks.

They are a potent dye stuff and the source of a brilliant red that was imported to Europe from Mexico and Peru. Kathy says a wonderful book to check out on the history of cochineal is A Perfect Red, by Amy Greenfield.

Mordanting. Dissolve 2 teaspoons of Alum in 32 ounces of water in a non-reactive dye pot. COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus.

A Perfect Red: Empire, Espionage, and the Quest for the Color of Desire [Greenfield, Amy Butler] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. A Perfect Red: Empire, Espionage, and the Quest for the Color of Desire of cochineal, a crushed insect dye which yielded a never before seen brilliant red color.

Spain built an empire on Cited by: Cochineal insect definition is - a small red cactus-feeding scale insect (Dactylopius coccus) the females of which are the source of cochineal. cochineal insect Cochineal insects (Dactylopius coccus; seen here in clusters of white) on Opuntia cactus.

Zyance. Cochineal has been replaced almost entirely by synthetic dyes, but it continues to be used principally as a colouring agent in cosmetics and beverages. Its dyeing power is attributed to cochinealin, or carminic acid, obtained by.

It isn't correct to blame cochineal dye for ALL cases of insect dye allergy. First, the quote above would need a proper citation, and second, it would need to be rephrased to correctly indicate that these findings apply broadly to a variety of insect-based dyes, and not necessarily to cochineal.

Dyanega3 September (UTC). Another red dye used in foods, FD&C Red Dye #40 (alternatively known as Red #40), is often mistakenly assumed to be a euphemism for cochineal or carmine.

It’s. not: it’s bug-free and is. Cochineal, or carmine as it is commonly known, is a red insect dye that has been used for centuries to dye textiles, drugs, and cosmetics.

In cosmetics, cochineal is used to dye lipstick, blush, and eyeshadow. The color created from this cochineal dye is absolutely beautiful. It. A classic study is Fred Gerber’s book, Cochineal and the Insect Dyes.

For a fascinating history of cochineal, read Amy Butler Greenfield’s, A Perfect Red. For a beautiful look at objects in museum collections, check out Cochineal Red: The Art History of a Color by Elena Phipps. Despite the labor-intensive process of harvesting the cochineal and a relatively modest yield, the dye continued to be a highly sought-after commodity and a popular alternative to kermes (a Persian red insect dye) throughout the Middle Ages.

Similar to other red dyes obtained from scale insects, the red coloring is derived from carminic acid. Cochineal was so important in 15th century Mexico that Moctezuma levied an annual tribute of cochineal dye and cochineal was Mexico’s second most valuable export after silver.

Cochineal was introduced into Europe by the Spanish in the s and very rapidly became the dye of choice for expensive but desirable scarlet and red clothes for kings. Botanical Colors Cochineal Insect Instructions.

Our cochineal insect instructions will help extract color from cochineal insects, native of Mexico and South insects are a traditional way of obtaining brilliant reds, pinks, and purples. Cochineal is a tiny insect that lives on Cactus plants. It produces carminic acid as a defense against predators and it is this acid, when extracted from the insect, that makes the dye.

It takes ab insects to make a pound of dye. Depending on the mordant used with it, it can produce vibrant red, scarlet, orange, and purple. Cochineal dye comes in two basic forms: cochineal extract — the bodies of the pulverized bugs — and carmine, which is further processed to create a more purified coloring.

and dyes such as alizarin were invented in the late 19th century, natural-dye production gradually diminished (Castillo, ). However, current health concerns over artificial food additives have renewed the popularity of cochineal dyes, and the increased demand has Cited by: 5.

Untilcochineal was one of many dyes that fell under the umbrella term “natural color” on ingredients lists. We list a few cochineal insects products: foods made with crushed bugs below.

- Natural Dye Red. See more ideas about Natural dyes, Dye, How to dye fabric pins. Cochineal – is the most important of the insect dyes. The females of Dactylopius coccus colonize the prickly pear (nopal) cactus native to Mexico, Central and South America and the Canary Islands.

Peru is currently the primary export country, shipping out over metric tons annually. This dye is found mostly in food, drugs and cosmetics. Cochineal insects produce a chemical called carminic acid, which helps them repel predators, and is the source of the dark purple color used to make cochineal dye.

The traditional method of obtaining the dye is to remove the insects from the cactus pads by hand, and then to dry them in the sun before crushing them into a powder. An Insect’s Colorful Gift, Treasured by Kings and Artists A view of the exhibition “Mexican Red, the Cochineal in Art,” at the Fine Arts Palace in Mexico City.Made from the crushed-up cochineal insect, the mysterious dye launched Spain toward its eventual role as an economic superpower and became one of the New World’s primary exports, as a red craze.